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What does heritage change?

Saturday June 4  9:00 AM to 10:30 AM

UQAM, pavillon Judith-Jasmin (J) – Salle Alfred-Laliberté


While, on the global scene, states maintain their leading role in the mobilization of social and territorial histories, on the local scale, regions, neighbourhoods and parishes have changed. Citizens and communities too: they latch on to heritage to express an unprecedented range of belongings, that no law seems to be able to take measures to contain, often to the discontent of local authorities, who become prisoners to illusions of inferiority or impotence. And once these calls to citizen participation succeed in heritage selection, we discover that heritage is neither as angelic, nor as homogeneous as past decades have led us to believe. Understanding this requires us now to integrate the figures and the concepts that colonial, or perhaps simply idiomatic, implementation has obscured. Mastering heritage asks us to dive into its mysteries, so that each and every one of us can one day grasp the political capabilities and economic values that are lurking in the shadows of the decisions that have imposed upon the world this mountain, this dance or this monument.

All of this leads to the question “What does heritage change?” It is thus a matter of considering heritage no longer as a victim, but as an agent of change. As a lever for development. This introductory keynote presentation invites a rethinking of heritage and an opening up of several projects of reflection and action: if heritage expresses what is shared by us all and allows us to inscribe it in our history, we must learn to master its powers.

Keynote speaker Lucie K. Morisset is the chairholder of the Canada Research Chair on Urban Heritage, and professor at the Department of Urban and Tourism Studies Department of the School of Management, University of Quebec in Montreal.
Historian of architecture by training, she is interested in the ideas and objects of urban planning, notably in company towns. She has been leading research on the morphogenesis and the semiogenesis of the built landscape and on the relations between identity and culture as they are manifested throughout the practices of heritage and the production of the heritage discourse, including action-research on heritage development and heritage empowerment in partnership with local communities. Lucie K. Morisset is a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada.
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La conférencière, Lucie K. Morisset, est titulaire de la Chaire de recherche du Canada en patrimoine urbain et professeure au Département d’études urbaines et touristiques de l’École des sciences de la gestion, à l’Université du Québec à Montréal.
Historienne d’architecture par formation, elle s’intéresse aux idées et aux objets de l’urbanisme, notamment dans les villes de compagnie. Elle mène des recherches sur la morphogenèse et la sémiogenèse du paysage construit et sur les relations entre l’identité, la culture et les territoires comme elles se manifestent par l’entremise des pratiques patrimoniales et la production des discours sur le patrimoine. Ses travaux incluent des initiatives de recherche-action sur la valorisation du patrimoine et les communautés patrimoniales en partenariat avec des collectivités locales. Lucie K. Morisset est membre de la Société royale du Canada.

Speaker : Lucie K. Morisset

Simultaneous translation

Free

Registration required : patrimoine@uqam.ca

Is tangible to intangible as formal is to informal ?

Saturday June 4  6:30 PM to 8:00 PM

UQAM, pavillon Judith-Jasmin (J) – Salle Alfred-Laliberté

Most of what we experience as heritage emerges into conscious recognition through a complex mixture of political and ideological filters, including nationalism. In these processes, through a variety of devices (museums, scholarly research, consumer reproduction, etc.), dualistic classifications articulate a powerful hierarchy of value and significance. In particular, the tangible-intangible pair, given legitimacy by such international bodies as UNESCO, reproduces a selective ordering of cultural artefacts and practices that follows the bureaucratic formalism of the nation-state and represses and excludes other perspectives. What losses, distortions, and biases spring from this framework, and how do we confront them?

Keynote speaker Michael Herzfeld is Ernest E. Monrad professor of the social sciences in the Department of Anthropology at Harvard University, where he has taught since 1991. He is also IIAS visiting professor of critical heritage studies at the University of Leiden (and senior advisor to the Critical Heritage Studies Initiative of the International Institute for Asian Studies, Leiden); professorial fellow at the University of Melbourne; and visiting professor and Chang Jiang (Yangtze River) scholar at Shanghai International Studies University (2015-2017). The author of eleven books—includingCultural Intimacy: Social Poetics in the Nation-State (1997; 3rded., 2016),The Body Impolitic: Artisans and Artifice in the Global Hierarchy of Value (2004),Evicted from Eternity: The Restructuring of Modern Rome (2009), andSiege of the Spirits: Community and Polity in Bangkok (2016)—and numerous articles and reviews, he has also produced two ethnographic films: Monti Moments(2007) andRoman Restaurant Rhythms(2011). He has served as editor ofAmerican Ethnologist (1995-1998) and is currently editor-at-large (responsible for “Polyglot Perspectives”) atAnthropological Quarterly. He is also a member of the editorial boards of several other journals, includingInternational Journal of Heritage Studies, Anthropology Today, andSouth East Asia Research. An advocate for “engaged anthropology,” he has conducted research in Greece, Italy and Thailand oninter alia, the social and political impact of historic conservation and gentrification, the discourses and practices of crypto-colonialism, social poetics, the dynamics of nationalism and bureaucracy, and the ethnography of knowledge among artisans and intellectuals.

Speaker: Michael Herzfeld; he will be introduced by Laurajane Smith

Simultaneous translation

Free

Registration required : patrimoine@uqam.ca

Keynote: Renaming, removal, recontextualization of heritage: Purging history, claiming the present, imagining the future? (What change-role for heritage professionals?)

Sunday June 5  2:00 PM to 3:30 PM

Musée des Beaux-Ars de Montréal – Cummings Auditorium

“What does heritage change?” is a multifaceted question to which the answer(s) (is)are in primary respects related to real-life negotiations among different groups of citizens, cultures, races, ethnic groups, sexual identities, and social classes about received, official and/or widely accepted or accommodated intangible attributes, cultural traditions, historic monuments, buildings, and other transmitted or revived historical legacies. Heritage designated by and for whom, for what motivations, and toward what ends constitutes fundamental criteria to clearly discern and identify the nature and import of change.
Sweeping African American condemnation of heritage-racism carved, etched, built, performed, and flown in honour of local and national heritage provides a critical summon and general framework for baseline questions, challenges, and options about what change heritage professionals in all cultures and places should consider.
Look around the Critical Heritage conference halls, see and hear who is present and who is not, ask yourself why, and consider what heritage change you should-can make.

Keynote speaker James Counts Early has served in various positions at the Smithsonian since first coming on board in 1972 as a researcher in Brazil and the Caribbean for the African Diaspora Folklife Festival program. He has served as assistant provost for educational and cultural programs, assistant secretary for education and public service, and interim director of the Anacostia Community Museum. A long-time advocate for cultural diversity and equity issues in cultural and educational institutions, he focuses his research on participatory museology, cultural democracy statecraft policy, capitalist and socialist discourses in cultural policy, and Afro-Latin politics, history, and cultural democracy. He has curated several Folklife Festival programs, including South Africa: Crafting the Economic Renaissance of the Rainbow Nation (1999) and Sacred Sounds: Belief and Society (1997). He holds a B.A. in Spanish from Morehouse College and completed graduate work (A.B.D.) in Latin American and Caribbean history, with a minor in African and African American history, at Howard University.

Speaker : James Count Early; he will be introduced by Michelle L. Stefano

Free

Simultaneous translation

Registration required : patrimoine@uqam.ca

Only in the future will it be heritage…

Monday June 6  3:30 PM to 5:00 PM

Concordia, John Molson School of Business Building (MB) – MB 1.210

Le patrimoine fait aujourd’hui l’objet d’attentions autant que d’agressions et de destructions. Cela peut s’expliquer par les difficultés de son identification ou de sa conservation. Cela peut plus profondément s’expliquer parce que, dès le départ, il célèbre un événement ou conserve une mémoire qui peut être ou devenir une source de dissensions et de conflits politiques. Enfin, sa reconnaissance suscite des gains économiques pour les uns, mais des pertes pour les autres.
Mais peut-être bien l’élément le plus important vient-il ici de ce que deux paradigmes concurrents animent le champ du patrimoine, des décisions et des comportements qui le scandent. Le premier entend construire et gérer le patrimoine comme un lieu de mémoire au nom d’une citoyenneté définie de manière plus ou moins précise : il imprime alors des logiques verticales, dictées par des lois-expertes qui produisent un bien qui se veut un bien collectif dans lequel se reconnaîtont ou non les individus. Le second voit dans le patrimoine des lieux de vie permettant à une communauté d’afficher son identité et d’entretenir une confiance en soi : il se développe cette fois-ci de manière horizontale, il est produit et consommé comme bien commun, mais en rencontrant alors d’autres limites, celles définies par la reconnaissance des autres communautés. Qu’ils s’associent ou s’opposent, des deux paradigmes définissent alors des approches et des pratiques différentes de son identification et de ses éléments constitutifs ; des droits culturels au patrimoine ; de sa labélisation et de sa conservation ; et, bien entendu, de sa valorisation et de sa mise en scène.
De telles tensions peuvent-elles se transformer et produire plus de synergie que de dispersion dans les efforts ? La difficulté de les mettre en cohérence nous semble venir de ce que dans notre identification du patrimoine nous donnons beaucoup plus de poids aux éléments du passé qu’à ceux de l’avenir que nous souhaitons construire. Ce premier élément est renforcé par le fait que nous sous-estimons le potentiel de créativité que le patrimoine nous offre, tant du point de vue économique que social. C’est pourtant à partir d’un avenir que nous partagerons, quoi qu’il arrive, que nous pouvons trouver les cohérences nécessaires à la définition du patrimoine. Et c’est ainsi que nous pouvons comprendre le dicton des Maoris de Nouvelle-Zélande : Le patrimoine c’est ce que j’ai reçu de mes enfants et ce que je rends à mes parents.

Keynote speaker Xavier Greffe is professor of economics at the Université de Paris I – Sorbonne, where he manages the PhD program in Economics of Arts, and president of the French National Commission on Artistic Employment. He is visiting professor at the Graduate Research Institute for Policy Studies, in Tokyo. Before, he has been successively research assistant in Los Angles (UCLA) and professor in Paris XIII, Algiers, and Paris I. For twelve years (1982-1994), he worked with the French administration, where he was director of New Technologies in the Department of National Education, and director of Training and Apprenticeship in the Department of Labour and Employment. He is consultant at OECD, UNESCO and WIPO. Recent books: Managing Our Cultural Heritage (Delhi and London: Aryan Books, 2002), Arts and Artists from an Economic Perspective (UNESCO and Economica, 2006), French Cultural Policy ([in Japanese] Tokyo: Bookdom, 2006) Artistes et marchés (Paris: La Documentation française, 2007); Culture Web : création, contenus et économie numérique (Paris: Dalloz, 2008); La politique culturelle en France (Paris: La Documentation française, 2009); L’artiste-entreprise (Paris: Dalloz, 2012 ; forthcoming in English, Springer) ; Artistes et politiques (Paris: Economica, 2013); Arte e mercado (Sao Paulo: Ilumi, 2013); La trace et le rhyzome : Les mises en scène du patrimoine culturel (Presses de l’Université du Québec, 2014); City, Culture, Creativity and Cities (co-editor with Emiko Kakiuchi, Suiyo-Cha, Tokyo, 2015).

Speaker : Xavier Greffe ; il sera présenté par Luc-Normand Tellier

Simultaneous translation

Free

Registration required: patrimoine@uqam.ca

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